Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Sights to See: Downtown Port of Spain, Trinidad


Originally a mangrove swamp, Port of Spain is now the second-largest in the Caribbean, after Kingston in Jamaica.  Construction is going on everywhere, like in downtown San Francisco but on a smaller scale.  Above-ground wire tangles are reminiscent of those in China and on my own residential street in California. 

tangle of wires in downtown Port of Spain, Trinidad
tangle of wires in downtown Port of Spain, Trinidad

Downtown Shopping
●Frederick and Charlotte streets are the main shopping streets.

corner shop in downtown Port of Spain, Trinidad
corner shop in downtown Port of Spain, Trinidad

police car across street from Bang Bang shop in Port of Spain, Trinidad
police car across street from Bang Bang shop in Port of Spain, Trinidad

Excellent City Centre  Considered the heart of downtown shopping, this popular shopping center has everything you might need under one roof--from designer clothing to electronics to jewelry--plus a bakery and food court.  You’ll also find everything for the home, including appliances, toys, school supplies, children’s clothing, books, and souvenirs.  You can even shop online.
(my articles:  3-24-17 my blog)

Excellent City Centre mall in Port of Spain, Trinidad
Excellent City Centre mall in Port of Spain, Trinidad

KFC  On Frederick St., across from Independence Square and a roundabout.  This branch of finger-lickin’-good chicken made the Guinness World Records in 2000 for selling the most chicken in the world and also for making the most money world-wide.  Trinidadians favor the spicy fried chicken.

famous branch of KFC in Port of Spain, Trinidad
famous branch of KFC in Port of Spain, Trinidad

Holy Trinity Cathedral  The oldest Anglican church in the Caribbean, this old building has a lovely mahogany ceiling.

exterior of Holy Trinity Cathedral in Port of Spain, Trinidad
exterior of Holy Trinity Cathedral in Port of Spain, Trinidad

interior of Holy Trinity Cathedral in Port of Spain, Trinidad
interior of Holy Trinity Cathedral in Port of Spain, Trinidad


More things to do in Trinidad.

More travel articles to inspire you and help you plan some spectacular getaways.

images ©2017 Carole Terwilliger Meyers


Friday, March 24, 2017

Sights to See: Carnival, Trinidad


Carnival  February 27 and 28 in 2017.  Held in Port of Spain, on the Monday (party day) and Tuesday (activities are more structured; parade day) preceding Ash Wednesday.  This massive event is the largest Carnival celebration in the Caribbean and the second largest in the world (Brazil is #1).  Costumes are stunning, and many are elaborate and massive--large enough to fill a room.  It is filled with music trucks, waving hands, and plenty of jumping.  To attend, you should book one year in advance, and do consider booking a hotel or tour package.

Carnival participants have their favorite costume designer.  Ronnie & Coro Mas Camp costumes (Warren/Ana sts, Woodbrook, 868-628-4521) is one of the best.  The costume charge here is TT5,000+ (just under US$1,000) and includes everything--admission, food, drinks.  Locals can no longer make everything in Trinidad.  Feather items are still made here, but belts and many other items are now produced in China.  “There are featherless birds and hairless horses in China because of carnival in Trinidad,” laughs Ronnie.  Note that Carnival participants purchase new costumes every year!  


owner Ronnie of Ronnie & Coro Mas Camp costumes in Port of Spain, Trinidad
owner Ronnie of Ronnie & Coro Mas Camp costumes in Port of Spain, Trinidad


worker at Ronnie of Ronnie & Coro Mas Camp costumes in Port of Spain, Trinidad
worker at Ronnie of Ronnie & Coro Mas Camp costumes in Port of Spain, Trinidad

Carnival costume at Ronnie of Ronnie & Coro Mas Camp costumes in Port of Spain, Trinidad
Carnival costume at Ronnie of Ronnie & Coro Mas Camp costumes in Port of Spain, Trinidad


Carnival costumes at Ronnie of Ronnie & Coro Mas Camp costumes in Port of Spain, Trinidad
Carnival costumes at Ronnie of Ronnie & Coro Mas Camp costumes in Port of Spain, Trinidad


travel writer Carole Terwilliger Meyers models feather costume at Ronnie of Ronnie & Coro Mas Camp costumes in Port of Spain, Trinidad
travel writer Carole Terwilliger Meyers models feather costume at Ronnie of Ronnie & Coro Mas Camp costumes in Port of Spain, Trinidad


travel photographer Chad Case models feather headpiece at Ronnie of Ronnie & Coro Mas Camp costumes in Port of Spain, Trinidad
travel photographer Chad Case models feather headpiece at Ronnie of Ronnie & Coro Mas Camp costumes in Port of Spain, Trinidad


More things to do in Trinidad.
 
More travel articles to inspire you and help you plan some spectacular getaways.

images ©2017 Carole Terwilliger Meyers; image of Carole Terwilliger Meyers c2017 Chad Case


Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Sights to See: Trinidad & Tobago



An Overview:
TRINIDAD & TOBAGO

Port of Spain cityscape in Trinidad
Port of Spain cityscape in Trinidad
Located in the southeastern region of the Caribbean just 7 miles off the Venezuelan coast, Trinidad was in fact once part of South America until it broke off in an earthquake broke it off.  They are the last island in the Caribbean chain. 
    Britain gained control of the islands in 1797 and brought in thousands of African slaves to work on sugar, cotton, and indigo plantations.  Today, descendants of those slaves make up most of Tobago's population.  When Britain abolished slavery in 1830, landowners brought in indentured workers from India, China, and the Middle East.  Their descendants give the islands a multi-ethnic appeal.  According to a guide, “We are mixing it up,” and he said that Trinis celebrate their religions together and are inclusive rather than divisive. 
     Because the islands existed separately for centuries, they each have a distinct personality.  Britain joined them together in the late 19th century, and the two islands gained independence in 1962 and became a republic in 1976.
     The official language is English, and half of the annual visitors are from the U.S.  People come here for the culture.  Driving is on the left--except when it isn’t--so defensive driving is essential on both islands.  “We drive like how we dance--dangerously,” an islander told me.  There are no all-inclusive resorts. 


TRINIDAD
Known as the “cultural capital of the Caribbean,” bustling Trinidad measures 65 miles long by 50 miles wide.  It is the birthplace of the limbo, the calypso, and singer Harry Belafonte--as well as of the steel pan drum, the only acoustic instrument invented in the 20th century.  It was ranked the happiest nation in the Caribbean by the United Nations’ World Happiness Report in 2013 and 2015.  And though the island is lively and developed, the tourism infrastructure is not well-developed.  You will find only one souvenir store downtown and no crafts market.  U.S. service men stationed here during WW II--there were more than 200,000 of them--cut some of the roads that provide access to a mountain range and secluded beaches along the north coast.


TOBAGO
Tiny Tobago is only 30 miles long by10 miles wide and mostly undeveloped.  Crown Point is the tourist hub, although Scarborough is the main town and where the cruise ships arrive.  This lush island features hidden beaches, great diving, and quaint villages.  It is home to the largest brain coral in the Western Hemisphere, and its Main Ridge Rainforest is the oldest protected reserve in the Western hemisphere.


FACES OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

Ricardo, a guide with Island Experiences in Trinidad
Ricardo, a guide with Island Experiences in Trinidad

owners of Coloz restaurant in Port of Spain, Trinidad
owners of Coloz restaurant in Port of Spain, Trinidad

server at HAKKA restaurant in Port of Spain, Trinidad
server at HAKKA restaurant in Port of Spain, Trinidad

pan player and song writer Kwesi Paul at Dan-Demonium pan yard in Port of Spain, Trinidad
pan player and song writer Kwesi Paul at Dan-Demonium pan yard in Port of Spain, Trinidad

guide Monica helps serve drinks at Blue Crab Restaurant in Scarborough, Tobago
guide Monica helps serve drinks at Blue Crab Restaurant in Scarborough, Tobago

More things to do in Trinidad.

More things to do in Tobago.

More travel articles to inspire you and help you plan some spectacular getaways.

images ©2017 Carole Terwilliger Meyers 

 

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Sights to See: San Diego de Alcala mission, San Diego, California


San Diego de Alcala mission  10818 San Diego Mission Rd., in Mission Valley, in San Diego.  Founded by Father Junipero Serra in 1769 at a site near the mouth of the San Diego River, this was the first California mission.  Also known as the San Diego Mission and the “Mother of the Missions,” it was relocated here--6 miles from its original site--in 1774 and has been rebuilt several times, making the current church the fifth on this site.  It is now a peaceful island amid a busy shopping area.  The mission church was named a minor basilica (a church of very important historical significance) by the Pope in 1976, and is one of only four of the California missions that are basilicas.  Two striking features are its impressive bell tower featuring one original bell and the restored church featuring textured plastering typical of Indian craftsmanship.  The well-maintained old gardens are also noteworthy.  You can rent a taped tour, which kids 7 and older particularly enjoy.  An annual Festival of the Bells that celebrates the mission’s founding takes place each July and includes a carnival and a blessing of both the bells and animals.  

front exterior of San Diego de Alcala mission in San Diego, California
front exterior of San Diego de Alcala mission in San Diego, California

display of all the California missions in the museum at San Diego de Alcala mission in San Diego, California
display of all the California missions in the museum at San Diego de Alcala mission in San Diego, California

bell tower at San Diego de Alcala mission in San Diego, California
bell tower at San Diego de Alcala mission in San Diego, California
 
 
interior garden at San Diego de Alcala mission in San Diego, California
interior garden at San Diego de Alcala mission in San Diego, California
 
Article about all 21 California missions.  

More things to do in San Diego.

More information about San Diego.

Things to do in nearby La Jolla. 

Travel articles to inspire and help you plan some spectacular local and foreign getaways.  Travel articles to inspire and help you plan trips.
 

images ©2017 Carole Terwilliger Meyers

 

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Things to Do: Sara D. Roosevelt Park, NYC


Sara D. Roosevelt Park  Lower East Side.  This 7.85-acre park underwent a $5 million renovation in 2011.  It features a soccer field, track, roller-skating rink, basketball courts, two playgrounds, and a senior center.     

promenade at Sara D. Roosevelt Park in NYC
promenade at Sara D. Roosevelt Park in NYC

Houston Street Playground 
 
Rivington Street Playground 

Hester Street Playground  On Hester St., between Chrystie and Forsyth Sts.  Facilities include colorful play structures with padded ground beneath, a large sand pit, swings, and an enclosed toddler area.  The area is unshaded, but in summer an assortment of water features operate. Picnic tables--which tend to be in use by adults playing card games--and restrooms are available.
 
Hester Street Playground in NYC
Hester Street Playground in NYC

tile depicting Hester Street Playground in NYC
tile depicting Hester Street Playground in NYC

adults playing game outside Hester Street Playground in NYC
adults playing game outside Hester Street Playground in NYC


adults playing game outside Hester Street Playground in NYC
adults playing game outside Hester Street Playground in NYC

More things to do in NYC.

More travel articles to inspire you and help you plan some spectacular getaways.

images ©2017 Carole Terwilliger Meyers